Tag Archives: Golf stroke mechanics

2 Things I Learned This Weekend

To start the week I’d like to share a thought I had while doing what I do on the weekend. That’s right: more business lessons from golf. I played with a friend who also happens to be a golf pro and like most people with whom one plays, he shared some things he saw in my swing that I might do differently (meaning a hell of a lot better). Normally, one would reciprocate  – “hey, you’re moving your head, you looked up, etc.”  Unlike most people, I had very little to tell him about his swing but I did read all the greens for him – we all do what we can!

An aerial view of a golf course in Italy

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The two things he got me thinking about the most to help me play better were also two things I believe are critical to success in business:  balance and commitment.  The two are related.  Without a full commitment to the swing, you “hang back” – you never move your weight forward and through the ball so the shot goes well off line.  If you over commit – shift your weight too far forward, you’ll generally pull the ball and it goes just as far off line the other way.

The trick is to maintain balance while fully committing to the swing.  While, of course, is exactly the business point.  None of us can function well if were half-hearted about what we do.  We either need to commit or find something else to do or another company to do it for.  We need to make smart choices about projects, partners and people and then commit fully to our decisions.  That gives us the best chance to succeed.

That said, we can’t get so caught up in what we do that we lose a sense of who we are – we need to stay balanced.  Think about how many folks you know that struggle to do one or the other or both.

Does that make sense, even to you non-golfers?

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Great Expectations

Not surprisingly with the weekend approaching, your writer’s thoughts turn to golf.  Every golfer who plays regularly should have a handicap index.  This is probably the most misunderstood statistic that golfers use.  The short explanation is that for every round one plays, you (or a computer, usually) figure out the stroke differential between what you shot and the stroke rating of the course.  You adjust that for something called the slope rating (a measure of how difficult the course is relative to other courses) and add it on to your list.  Your handicap index is 95% of the average of the ten best (lowest) adjusted stroke differentials of your last twenty rounds.  Clear?  Good, because it’s a great business lesson too.

Typical elements of a hole on a golf course: t...

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In One!

A golf ball.

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I have a confession to make.  I took the morning off to play golf before the horrible weather hit since it doesn’t sound as if we’ll be able to play this weekend at all.  There was nothing on the calendar; no one is awaiting any input from me.  I shouldn’t feel guilty about it especially since my boss was fine with it (oh wait…).

As it turns out, it was one of the best things I could have done for my spirit and I want to talk about that today instead of food.  I realize that food can be spiritually uplifting as well but let me explain. Continue reading

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The Masters Lesson

2009 Masters Tournament

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I’m sorry that I’ve not posted until late today although frankly I could have written this immediately after the conclusion of The Masters.  If you love sports at all and didn’t watch the final round, shame on you because you really missed one of the best, most compelling afternoons I can remember in any sport.  What struck me beyond that, however, was the huge difference between the man who has won 14 major championships and the kid who is still trying to win his first.  The former put on a great performance that ultimately proved to be too little too late.  The latter blew a lead and his chance to win and yet he taught the older guy a lesson. Continue reading

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