Tag Archives: Security

Locking Your Door

There are many homes in the town where I live that aren’t locked up when nobody is home.

English: A candidate icon for Portal:Computer ...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

While in some ways it’s a nice relic of a time and society long gone, I’ve always wondered how people were able to file insurance claims or police reports if they got robbed. After all, they did nothing to protect their privacy other than trusting in the good will of the surrounding community.
Unfortunately, the world out there contains a fair number of evil-doers, and that includes the digital world of the web. Most of us know that, I’m afraid, but I’ve never really been sure how many of us take action to prevent those bad guys from entering our digital homes. Oh sure, maybe we use the pre-installed anti-virus stuff (hopefully with up to the minute virus definitions) but how many people are being proactive about keeping their data doors locked?
The folks from Microsoft released a study yesterday and the answer was surprising, at least to me. You can read the executive summary of and view a slide show about the findings here.  The big ones:

  • Forty-five percent said they feel they have little or no control over the personal information companies gather about them while they are browsing the Web or using online services, such as photo- sharing, travel or gaming.
  • Forty percent said they feel they ”mostly” or “totally understand” how to protect their online privacy.
  • An equal number of people (39 percent) said they are turning to friends and family, as well as privacy statements, as their top source for privacy information.
  • Almost a third of those surveyed (32 percent) said they always consider a company’s privacy reputation, track records, and policies when choosing which websites to visit or services to use.

OK, a lot of people get that they’re being tracked and not always for benign purposes, so surprisingly (to me, at lesast) they’re taking action. When asked what, if any, actions respondents had taken to protect the privacy of their online data, the vast majority (85%) report that they had actively taken steps. The most common action reported was the deletion of cookies that may be used to record and track online behavior.

I think this is good news –  locked doors keep the crime rate in our little digital town down.  Of course, it also means that any of us who want to be invited in to consumers’ cookie caches need to play nice.  That means have a clear privacy policy, explain how and if we’re using the data, and make sure that users read and understand what we’re doing.  Otherwise, we’ll have to break in to steal that information, and I think we all know where that can land us.  Regulatory bodies worldwide are already considering harsh and cumbersome rules and we know that they’ll probably get something wrong.  It’s on the industry to get ahead of this and to behave, encouraging people to take charge – lock their doors – and make it simple to do so.

Are you locking your data door?  Who are you letting in and why?

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Filed under digital media, Helpful Hints

Me No Want Cookie

Let’s begin this week with something that caught my eye at the tail end of last week.  It was an announcement in Media Post with the headline [x+1] Finds Way Around Third-Party Cookie Rejection.  For those of you unfamiliar with the nuances of cookies, a third-party cookie is a little tracking file placed by a site other than the one you’re visiting.  In other words, if you come to Keith Ritter Media to figure out how to hire me and my site places a cookie from a site where I’m hosting an image, thereby enabling that site to track your web browser, I’ve placed a third-party cookie.

The announcement is important for two reasons – first, many ad networks use third-party cookies to track users across sites (my site’s cookie is useless to any other site) for targeting purposes; second, because some browsers default to disallowing third-party cookies and lots of other users have set their browsers to do the same.  Kind of makes one wonder about the announcement – here’s why. Continue reading

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Filed under digital media, Helpful Hints

You Know What They Mean

Another report of marketing brilliance (sarcasm alert) from the digital world. This time it’s a report that ad networks are continuing to track users who opt out based on the flimsiest of reasoning. As a consumer, I’m not surprised and not pleased. As a person who works in digital marketing, I’m appalled since this is exactly the sort of behavior that leads to more rules and less innovation. It puts an entire industry in a bad light even though it’s a few bad apples and not everyone.  But I’ll lay out the fact and let you decide if I’m overreacting. Continue reading

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Somebody’s Watching Me

I was watching Detroit 187 last night.  It’s a terrific cop show even if it’s a little disconcerting to see Christopher Moltisanti on this side of the law for a change.  The cast is filled with other familiar faces, the plots are consistently good, and I’m becoming a regular viewer.

In last night’s episode, the cops solved a murder the old fashioned way – examining clues and putting the pieces of evidence together into a coherent completed puzzle to unravel what had happened.  This, of course, made me think of the report coming soon from the FCC as well as a few other controversies out there.  Here’s what I mean. Continue reading

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Filed under digital media, Reality checks

My I.T. Department

The A8N VM CSM, an ASUS microATX motherboard
Image via Wikipedia

One of the joys of being self-employed and a one-man band is that I know the guys that run all the departments.  The head of finance is lost sometimes but he has good people to call.  The head of marketing seems crazy but he gets results.  The Chief Strategy Officer is a genius.  The travel office is a mess.  We outsource legal.  And then there’s I.T. Continue reading

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Thriller

An Aston Martin DB5 as seen in Goldfinger.

Image via Wikipedia

I love a good thriller.  There is something about the Bond movies, the Bourne books, and others of that ilk that make us fearful yet happy all at the same time.  Inevitably, these books and movies are about a serious situation that threatens a large number of people and involves a lot of money.  The really scary thing is that we had a real one of these recently and it’s going to make a terrific piece even though no one gets shot. Continue reading

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