Tag Archives: IPad

Detective Movies and Broadband

When I watch a thriller or detective movie, I find myself paying a lot of attention to minor things – a front desk clerk, a random event like what’s playing on a TV in a bar – because inevitably the end of the movie involves something that was hinted at earlier.  The key is usually something to which no one seems to be paying attention but would have been recognized as highly significant had they been.

I thought of that when I read a couple of articles over the last week and as I’m going through the reports of yesterday’s new iPad announcement.  Let’s see if the pieces – none of which is seen as a big deal – get you thinking about the ending as they do to me.

First off, there was the report from Nielsen that looks at cord-cutters – those homes that have abandoned cable TV and are using the Internet and over the air signals to watch the programming they previous got via cable:

Though less than 5 percent of TV households, homes with broadband Internet and free, broadcast TV are on the rise—growing 22.8 percent over last year. These households are also found to exhibit interesting video behaviors: they stream video twice as much as the general population and watch half as much TV.

Even among those who haven’t cut the cord, there is a shift to video and Internet provided by the telephone companies:

The number of homes subscribing to wired cable has decreased 4.1 percent in the past year at the same time that telephone company-provided and satellite TV have seen increases of 21.1 percent and 2.1 percent, respectively.

Maybe it’s in part due to higher bit-rates available from companies traditionally seen as ISP’s?  After all, access to broadband Internet is a big priority:

Demonstrating that consumers are increasingly making Internet connectivity a priority, 75.3 percent pay for broadband Internet (up from 70.9% last year); 90.4 percent pay for cable, telephone company-provided TV or satellite. Homes with both paid TV and broadband increased 5.5 percent since last year.

OK – that’s a few of the “minor” characters – nothing huge there.  Now add this:

Across Europe, the Web has surpassed TV as the primary platform for 18-to-35 viewers to watch their favorite sport, according to new research conducted by Havas Sport & Entertainment for the Global Sports Forum Barcelona.

And this:

Stateside, the evidence suggests that more sports nuts are choosing to forgo pay-TV services for Internet services. According to The NPD Group, iVOD users reduced the time they spent watching television shows, news and sports via pay-TV companies by 12% between August 2010 and August 2011.

Every major sports league has some sort of online pay package available, which is not new.  Now let’s add in the new iPad which is becoming the second screen of choice for a lot of people along with an improved AppleTV that makes putting streamed content on to your HD television a snap.  Suddenly, we might be looking at a milestone (and the end of the movie for some businesses).  Live sports is one of the (and I think THE) killer apps.  Up until recently it’s been hard (or illegal) to find your live sport of choice outside of pay TV available through a cable operator.  Suddenly, higher speed broadband married to better devices married to that content being available via your ISP and the ability to throw it on to your big screen TV with no loss of quality while marrying it to apps, data, and social interfaces might be a twist no one saw coming.  Except I think maybe now we can.

What do you think?

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Thinking Differently

Apple used the slogan in its advertising “think different” years ago.  Over time, I think we all can appreciate how that mantra, perhaps grammatically incorrect or perhaps not,  has come to be reality in the types of products produced by Apple.  I’ve always admired that much of what Apple produces isn’t original per se – there were mp3 players before the iPod, for example – but Apple manages to take a product sector as it evolves, marry it to better technology, and change everything.

What has me babbling like an Apple fanboy this morning?  A piece of research on TV‘s of course, and a thought about how some research points to the need to think out of the box. Continue reading

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TV Is Only Half Of It

A little research to start the week.  A new study came out from Burst Media last week.  It was about how people view and interact with online video.  Not very much surprising in it – 71.6% of web users overall watch online content in a typical week—and 39.0% of all viewers spend between one and five hours per week with online video. Men aged 18-34 are the heaviest consumers of online video content, with 19.7% saying they consume 10 or more hours of video on the web per week.    Not much of a shock – almost every content company with which I work has a focus on video and I suppose it’s sort of chicken and egg – there’s more content offered in the form of video so the usages rises and because the demand goes up, content providers produce more.

There was also a nugget that made me pause. Continue reading

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Taking The Tablet

There is an excellent, thought-provoking article in the current edition of the Sports Business Journal about tablet computers.  The piece examines what effects the popularity of these devices have been across a number of sectors in the sports business.  Sponsor rights, media distribution, and on-field use are just a few of the areas in which tablets are having an impact.  Disruptive doesn’t begin to describe it.

Behold the iPad in All Its Glory.

Image via Wikipedia

One thing I did notice as the article ran through the issues (which I’ll discuss in a minute) is that the way in which many of the parties involved have tried to deal with this new round peg is to try to fit it in the same square holes as other things without much success.  Let me explain. Continue reading

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Unplugged

Kate the Desktop Computer

Image by Gino Carteciano via Flickr

I have seen the future and it’s disconnected! From what? From the wall, from the wire, and maybe from you if you’re a content creator who’s not thinking ahead. I used to write this on my desktop PC; today I’m writing it on my laptop; tomorrow, I could be writing it on a tablet or my phone (which I do sometimes now in a pinch). Fortunately for me, the CMS I use (WordPress) has versions optimized for each device. It’s not quite so easy, however, if you’re producing content rather than software, especially video content, and that’s going to be a critical fix on your “to do” list if it’s not already. Continue reading

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Because I Can

Image representing iPhone as depicted in Crunc...

Image via CrunchBase

There is a hugely alarming report in the Guardian today about the iPhone. In a nutshell, the device keeps a record of everywhere it goes. The file is hidden and is synched to your computer. Assuming you are the one carrying the phone, it becomes very easy to find out everyplace you’ve been once someone wanting to know your history gains access to your phone or your computer.
That’s bad enough but here’s what’s worse: Apple doesn’t seem to be collecting the data since the researchers found that the file doesn’t “phone home” or get otherwise used in the synching process.  Which raises the obvious question. Continue reading

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7/4 Time

Basic time signatures: 4/4, also known as comm...

Image via Wikipedia

How about a little music this morning to provide the soundtrack to our daily business discussion?  I think most of you are familiar with the basic rock beat of thousands of songs.  You might be tapping your feet to that 4/4 beat as you read this.  Or maybe you prefer 3/4 time – a typical waltz.  If we add in 2/4 time – kind of a baby brother to 4/4 – and 6/8 time – maybe a big brother to a waltz – we’ve about covered most of the music on your iPod.

Then there are those who think differently and use 7/4 time.  You’ve heard it – “Money” by Pink Floyd and “Estimated Prophet” by The Grateful Dead are the two best known examples.  This is a time signature that feels familiar and yet it’s just a bit off.  Sound like something you can use? Continue reading

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