Tag Archives: Internet service provider

When You Don’t Know What Business You’re In

I started 2019 by buying a new home. When I say new, I mean brand spanking new as in “just built.” As I’m preparing to move in, I did what most folks would do first these days and called my local Cable TV/ISP to come set up the house. The builder did a good job of preparing the house for both cable TV and for wired internet and phone. There is a large junction box in a closet with both coax and Cat 6 wire running to most rooms. The living room and master bedroom both have conduit running into the crawl space for wires to be run easily. Frankly, I thought the hardest part of getting everything set up would be joining the coax and network wires that were hanging out of the side of the house to the main feeder lines. I was so wrong, and the reason why I was is quite instructional for any of us in business.

Hooking the house to the main lines was easy. Then, the tech set up the cable modem and router for my high speed (400MB+) wifi network. So far, so good, The problem came when I asked about connecting the wires that were in the closet to a switch or the router. None of them have caps – the little plugs – on them. “I don’t do that,” he said. But how can I connect the rooms to the network? What about putting the coax wires into a splitter for cable in the various rooms? At least that would help me identify which wires ran to which rooms. No help there either, even though he is the cable installer.

The final bit of laziness came when he informed me that he couldn’t run any cable through the conduits. He said he couldn’t find the conduit opening in the crawl space even though he pushed a long rod down the conduit and then went to look for it in the crawl space. I went down the next morning and found the openings in about 2 minutes. Yes, it was late (4p) on a Friday afternoon and I’m sure he wanted to get out of there, but still.

So here are some things we can all take away. First, the fact that the tech had no idea how to run wired internet tells me that the cable TV companies still think they’re in the cable TV business. Any look at the numbers will show you that people care far more about broadband and their ability to stream than they do traditional cable TV. If you are an Internet Service Provider, that you need to provide the damn service, and that includes wiring houses. I want my smart TV’s wired in, along with my game console. It’s a much better experience than via wifi, even high-speed wifi.

Second, the techs are customer service people along with being technicians. This guy was very nice but did nothing to solve my problem. To make matters worse he never left any paperwork so I have no way to know what exactly he did do. I can’t even tell you what my VOIP phone number is. Any company representative that deals with customers in any way should be trained to do so properly. They must have a focus on solving problems, not on creating them. And they certainly should never lie.

My ISP doesn’t know what business it’s in. They still think they are proving cable TV. They also still don’t understand how the power in all businesses has shifted to the customer. Let’s all agree to start 2019 by rethinking what businesses we’re really in and how we provide it to our customers, shall we?

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Filed under Consulting, Huh?

Legalized Discrimination

I work with a number of startup companies, as I’ve mentioned before. There are a whole host of issues that these newbies face but one they don’t, if they’re digital, is the same sort of access to their potential audiences as is enjoyed by their much larger, entrenched competition. The reason for this is an underlying principle of the Internet which is that all traffic – those little packets of information that carry data, pictures, sound, etc. – is handled equally, both by the “backbone” companies responsible for transport and by your Internet Service Provider. You know – the folks (or folks, if you have a cable provider that provides internet access and a wireless company) to whom you send a check each month in return for the ability to send cat videos to your friends.

The reason for this post is to call your attention to the increasingly loud noises out of DC about giving those ISPs the ability to discriminate. Three years ago, John Oliver did a fantastic job of explaining why this issue is important and last Friday night, he did so again. Why did he need to? Because rules that were put in place to protect everyone are being changed.

Suppose you watch those cat videos on three different video platforms: YouTube, Vimeo, and a startup called CatVideosRule. You notice that the first two are crystal clear and in full high-def, while the last takes forever to load, buffers a lot, and isn’t very clear. It’s likely that the reason for that isn’t that the startup is using bad technology but that your ISP is prioritizing traffic. Maybe they are getting fees from YouTube and Vimeo. Maybe they don’t like cat videos and are slowing down the startup. The reason doesn’t matter. What does is that it’s discrimination and it’s going to be legal. In my mind, once ISPs get to pick and choose, it’s not a big step for them to begin censoring the content as well. You know: if you want to be on our network at full speed you will not criticize us, etc.

The new head of the FCC is suggesting that we just ask the ISPs to promise they’ll play nice. These are the same ISPs that promised you 50MB speed and deliver 30MB with no fee adjustment or apology. We are already seeing some services become “zero-rated”, which means that using them doesn’t count against any data plan you may have. It’s bad enough that the ISPs are boosting their own services at the expense of others. Legalizing another form of discrimination could be the death knell of one of the things that have fostered the dynamic, disruptive growth of our digital world. Do you agree? Are you following this story?

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Filed under digital media, Huh?

Some Important News You Might Have Missed And Why You Should Care

There was a bit of news that broke last week which you might have missed since it seems that the election drowns most other news out. The FCC told Internet Service Providers to be much more explicit concerning what information it collects and shares with others, and provide (mostly) clear “opt-in” requirements on some of that data collection. Hopefully, you realize that more than any other entity in the digital age your ISP (and that can be your wireless provider as well) know pretty much everything you do on the internet.

Not surprisingly, there were immediate outcries from both the broadband providers as well as from the Association of National Advertisers. “The FCC’s new sweeping privacy rules decision is unprecedented, misguided, counterproductive, and potentially extremely harmful,” the advertisers’ organization said in a statement.

This comes on the heels of Google changing their policy related to how it connects DoubleClick advertising to other data that it has about you, allowing the company to actually link your name and other identifying information to you as you surf the web. The real issue is that Google isn’t being very clear about how this information is going to be used. At leat, however, they do give you the ability to opt-out and to clear your history. Your ISP gives you no such option. Be that as it may, having to opt out is far different from granting permission by having opted in.

Obviously, the ad industry is upset because less useful data means diminished ability to track and target consumers. Having spent a career in the media business I know that this could be bad for content providers as well as marketers. But I can’t understand why explaining clearly and transparently what you’re collecting and why as well as allowing consumers control over how their data is collected and used is a bad idea. Failing to do so leads to ad blocking or worse.

What could be worse? Check out Sudo. As this article explains it, Sudo allows you to create:

nine “virtual identities,” each of which is associated with a phone number, email address, credit card number, and even profile picture. They’re digital nom de guerres, in essence — fictional profiles for services, websites, and apps to which you’d rather not supply your personal information…Sudos live as long as you want. You can delete one after a week, or devote a profile to activities like online shopping, social networking, or calling.

That, in my mind, is worse. Data is collected and associated with a false person who just disappears. So if I decide to label myself as a 35-year-old woman (which is quite different from my much older male self), marketers will waste money promoting products to me I won’t care about. When I get sick of that persona, I’ll disappear her.

Being transparent and honest with your customers isn’t optional anymore. You can fight legislation but fighting consumer desires is much harder. I suspect that the ISP’s will get around these rules by burying the information they’re forced to disclose in some click-wrap agreement. Nobody reads them; they just click “agree” and move on. I think this is a missed opportunity for the ISP’s to change their behavior, their business model, and their relationship with their customers. You?

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Filed under digital media, What's Going On